Dentistry

Canine Dentistry

By the age of two, periodontal disease affects roughly 80% of dogs. 
 

After your pet eats his daily meal, food particles and bacteria adhere to the teeth and gum line and form plaque. If plaque is not removed within a few days, it solidifies into a cement-like material called tartar. As more tartar builds up under the gum, the gum becomes inflamed. This inflammation is called Periodontal Disease. But Periodontal Disease doesn’t just affect the mouth: bacteria can enter the bloodstream and create health problems elsewhere in the body like the kidneys and the heart. It might be hard to believe, but failing to care for your dog’s teeth can cause big problems long term.

 

It is important to have a dental health plan for your dog. Brushing your dog's teeth daily can significantly reduce his risk of developing periodontal disease and ensure that his teeth stay healthy. Dental chews, rubber toys, and specially-formulated dental diets will also help keep plaque and tartar at bay.

 

Your veterinarian should examine your dog's teeth regularly. A dental cleaning may be necessary to stop the advance of periodontal disease. Infected teeth will also need to be removed.
We perform dental cleanings only under anesthesia.

 

Feline Dentistry

Periodontal disease also affects cats with roughly 70% of cats affected by the age of two.

Your veterinarian should examine your cat's teeth regularly. A dental cleaning may be necessary to stop the advance of periodontal disease. Infected teeth will also need to be removed.
We perform dental cleanings only under anesthesia.

Before and after dental scaling and polishing to remove tartar build-up and prevent further decay

IMG_0029.JPG